Kim Daneault
KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan | 603-345-7783 | [email protected]


Posted by Kim Daneault on 11/10/2019


 

Are you familiar with “green” home builders? They are contractors who construct homes from sustainable or renewable products. These green home builders use durable materials in building all kinds of homes ranging from individual bungalows to expansive, real estate developments. Just like traditional builders, they handle diverse types of construction but build in a way that minimizes waste.


Green homes have gained recent popularity due to their energy efficiency, water efficiency and minimal impact on the environment. Apart from their environmental impact, green homes are known to boost the quality of living for the occupants. Moreover, a green home can enhance their overall well-being.


While searching for a suitable, green home builder, you must examine aspects of their past work like their building strategies, experience, quality of work and expertise. A green home builder must be actively involved in all phases of your home construction; they should be a part of the process from the time of design inception to the completion of the home.


Here are things to consider before employing the services of a green home builder:


License


Just like other businesses, it is essential for real estate builders to have a license that permits them to construct green homes. These licenses are issued by the state, federally, or via local city council. It is proof that a particular contractor has a permit to build a sustainable house. Therefore, you must ensure that a green home builder has a license before employing his/her services.


Experience/ Expertise


Experience is a quality that a green home builder must have. In addition to a license, builders may seek the designation "Certified Green Professional" (CGP), which is an industry determination requiring them to pass specific coursework to obtain and maintain. In addition to certification, to choose a reliable and experienced green home builder, you should endeavor to ask your prospective green home builders to show some similar projects that they have done in the past.


Green builders who believe in the quality of their work may refer you to their past customers. When meeting these customers, ask questions that will give you an idea of the builder’s level of expertise, and how living in a green home enhances their lives.


Knowledge is power, so don't be afraid to ask the tough and necessary questions to ensure you're getting the most value and efficiency for your money. To find a green home in your area, seek the advice of your real estate professional today.





Posted by Kim Daneault on 11/3/2019

You likely aspire to sell your house as quickly as possible. However, you may not need to set a deadline for selling your residence to achieve your desired result. In fact, there are lots of things you can do to speed up the home selling journey, including:

1. Boost Your House's Curb Appeal

A home that boasts amazing curb appeal may draw buyers' attention as soon as it becomes available. Lucky for you, it may be easy to bolster your house's curb appeal in no time at all.

To improve your home's curb appeal, you may want to complete assorted home exterior upgrades. Mowing the grass and eliminating weeds, for example, could make your front lawn stand out to buyers. Or, if you have cracked or damaged home siding, you can always devote time and energy to repair it.

Of course, if you need help with home exterior enhancements, you can reach out to home improvement professionals. If you have home improvement pros at your side, you can accelerate the process of upgrading your house's curb appeal.

2. Establish a Competitive Initial Asking Price

The initial asking price of your home should account for the age and condition of your residence, along with the current state of the real estate market. That way, you can set a price for your home that falls in line with buyers' expectations.

Generally, it helps to conduct an appraisal before you list your residence. An appraisal report is based on a wide range of factors, including the prices of comparable homes in your city or town. Therefore, if you perform an appraisal, you could receive a property valuation that helps you determine how to price your home competitively.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

As a home seller, it never hurts to receive expert support as you navigate the property selling journey. Fortunately, real estate agents are available nationwide, and these housing market professionals can offer great insights into what it takes to quickly sell a house.

A real estate agent first will learn about you and what you hope to accomplish. Next, a real estate agent will develop a plan designed to help you achieve your home selling goals. You and your real estate agent then will put this plan into action and adjust it as needed. Perhaps best of all, if you receive an offer to purchase your home, a real estate agent can help you decide whether to accept, reject or counter this proposal.

Furthermore, a real estate agent can help you bolster your home's curb appeal, establish the optimal initial asking price for your home and much more. And if you have any concerns during the house selling journey, a real estate agent is ready to respond to them right away.

For those who want to speed up the home selling journey, it helps to prepare. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you can list your home, ensure it generates significant interest from buyers and move quickly to finalize a house sale.





Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/27/2019

Many sellers rely on agents to help them to deal with the task of selling their home. If you’re looking to buy or sell a home, a real estate agent isn’t required. There are many advantages and disadvantages to selling your home as a “For Sale By Owner” (FSBO). Read on to discover the good and bad of selling your home on your own. 


The Pros


Avoid Paying Commission


Real estate commission is the main reason that many sellers choose to go it alone. You’ll pay about 6% commission on the sale of your home between buyers and sellers agents. When figuring out the asking price for your property, this number that you’ll pay for a commission is included. This sale price also should be enough to pay off the remaining balance on the property. If you don’t have a lot of equity in your home, an FSBO may be your only option if you can’t afford the commission. Another option is to wait to sell your home until you have built up enough equity for the transaction to make sense for you. 


You Can Find Other Resources To Help You Sell The Property


There are so many resources available to FSBOs in today’s market. Yards signs aren’t the only thing that sellers can use to get people interested in their property. Many websites and resources assist people taking the FSBO approach. You still may not be able to get your property listed everywhere if you’re not a real estate agent. 


Cons


You Won’t Be Able To List The Property Fully


Only licensed real estate agents have access to the MLS, where buyers' agents and other websites pull available properties.  Not having access to this can be a deterrent to the marketing of your home. You could miss out on getting many home showings that you otherwise would if your house was listed on the MLS. 


There’s No One To Help You With Paperwork And Negotiations


Real estate agents certainly earn their commission. There is a lot of work in both selling and buying a home. If you hire an agent, he’ll be taking phone calls, sending off forms, and dealing with the negotiations on the property. An agent will also coordinate home showings and have the ability to show your property when you’re unavailable. If you go it alone, you won’t have that assistance and may be a bit overwhelmed during the selling process.


A real estate agent also understands the lingo better than someone who has been outside of the business. There are many advantages to paying his fee if you decide to hire him for the sale of your home.           






Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/20/2019

Getting a professional inspection is one of the most important parts of closing on a home. An inspection can save you endless time and money if it catches repairs that need to be made, and it can draw your attention to any problems that could be dangerous to you and your family.

Many buyers, especially those who are buying a home for the first time, aren’t sure what to expect during a home inspection. They might have questions that they’re afraid to ask the inspector, or they might feel like they should be asking questions but don’t know the right ones to ask.

In this article, we’ll give you the rundown on the home inspection process. We’ll explain how to get started, what to expect on inspection day, and what to do with your findings.

Contingency clauses

Before closing on a home, it’s important to make sure your offer involves a contingency clause, otherwise known as a “due diligence contingency.” This section of your contract gives you the right to perform a home inspection within a given number of days.

Sellers may inform you that they have recently had the home inspected and even offer to show you the results of the inspection. However, it is best practice to have your own inspection performed with a trusted professional.

After your offer is accepted, you should begin calling and getting quotes from inspectors immediately.

Before the inspection

Once you’ve considered your options of inspectors and chosen an inspector, it’s time to schedule your inspection. Both you and your real estate agent should attend the inspection.

You’ll both have the opportunity to ask questions. However, it’s a good idea to write down your minor questions and ask them before or after the inspection so that the professional you’ve hired is able to focus on their work to do the best possible job inspecting your future home.

During the inspection

The inspection itself is pretty straightforward. Your inspector will examine the exterior and interior of your home, including several vital components and then will provide you with a report of their findings.

They will inform you of repairs that need to be made now, parts of the home that should be monitored for future repairs, and anything that poses a safety concern to you and your family.

The parts of your home the inspector will review include:

  • Roof

  • Exterior Walls

  • Foundation

  • Garage

  • Land grading

  • Plumbing

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation, air conditioning

  • Appliances

There are some things your inspection won’t include. For example, mold, termite damage, and other issues that aren’t easily observable without causing damage might be missed by your inspector and will require a specialist.

After the inspection

Once the inspection is complete, you will have the chance to ask any remaining questions. You can review the findings of your inspection report and make decisions about how you want to handle any repairs that need to be made.

You may choose to ask the seller to make the repairs noted in your inspection report. If they refuse, you can withdraw from your contract at any time.


Ultimately, the choice will be yours what to do with the findings from the inspection. But having one can save you immeasurable money on impending repairs that you may not have been aware of.




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Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/13/2019

You might have heard one or two things about a short sale in real estate. It may look like a hard concept, but it is just another term for a conditioned sale. 

What is a short sale?

A short sale in real estate happens when a property owner needs to sell the property for less than the amount owed on the mortgages or liens. It occurs when the current fair market selling price is lower than the sum of the mortgages owed, but the seller must sell anyway.

It is a term coined to mean that the current seller is short of cash to repay the original mortgage that is currently outstanding and cannot receive an offer of a high enough price to cover it. Since the seller is short of money, he has to ask for help from the bank to recoup a portion of the loan. 

Today, short sales rarely happen. They were prevalent during the Great Recession but not anymore. In the rare cases where one is necessary, the bank may take into account mitigating circumstances such as a death of the primary income-earner, or a homeowner subject to a health challenge.

Advantages of making a short sale in real estate 

As gloomy as it sounds, short selling is not at all that bad. The following are some of the advantages that come with short selling: A short sale protects your credit score. Instead of the alternatives, foreclosure, and default, a short sale protects your credit score as it shows that you make financially sound decisions. Credit bureaus often frown upon a foreclosure, so it is better to make a short sale.

A short sale helps you avoid foreclosure. One of the worst things that one can do to a credit score is to add a foreclosure record on it. Hence, it is better to make a short sale as it deflects the adverse effects of having a mortgage foreclosed.

A short sale saves the seller from paying the fees that usually get paid by the seller. The charges get covered by the bank.

Disadvantages of making a short sale in real estate 

There is one disadvantage to making a short sale in real estate, and that is the lack of cash received on the part of the seller. This one is a given since the quick sale is a Hail-Mary pass in an otherwise potential foreclosure on the property.

Final Tip

Sometimes you need to short sell your property because you need to move to another state or country and keeping another property is not practical. Hire a real estate agent, one specializing in short sales, today to help you with the transaction.




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