Kim Daneault
KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan | 603-345-7783 | [email protected]


Posted by Kim Daneault on 7/14/2019

House hunting can be enjoyable but becomes overwhelming pretty quickly. After looking at many different houses, they can all start to look the same. It’s hard to remember what homes had what features. In order to make a right decision on which home to make an offer on, you’ll need to remember the details of each house. Read on for tips to help you house hunt like a pro.


Keep Track Of The Homes You Have Looked At


Whether you’re doing simple online searches or touring open houses, it’s easy for your mind to get jumbled as to what you have seen. It’s a good idea to keep a record of homes with their addresses as to where they are located, the color of the house, and the desirable features contained within the home. This way, you can have an overall picture of what you want. 


Know What Features Are Important 


You should make a list of everything you’re looking for in a home before you even start searching. Include things like:


  • The price range
  • How big of a house you’re looking for
  • How many bedrooms
  • How many bathrooms
  • Additional features like walk-in closets
  • Eat-in kitchen or dining room
  • What type of home you’re looking for
  • How many stories you want the home to be



You can then branch off from the essentials on the list adding other desirable features in a property like a pool, a jacuzzi, a large backyard, or a fireplace. Then, you should make a list prioritizing what is the most important to you in your home search. Things like the number of bedrooms and the size of the home will be a higher priority than a jacuzzi tub. 


Look At Your Commute


One of the most significant factors in finding a home is how far it is from your workplace. The closer you are to work, the less stressful your life will be. If you take the train or a bus to work, it may be easier to live close to a station or stop. On the flip side, to be closer to work what are you sacrificing? Are you close to schools, parks, stores, and other regularly visited spots? See what locations suit your lifestyle.


Review What You’ve Looked At

Once you have done your research and decided what you need and want, it’s time to make comparisons. Look at the prices of each home and see what they have to offer for the money. Once you decide the price and amenities are on par with your original wishlist, the house is a good candidate to put an offer on.             






Posted by Kim Daneault on 7/7/2019

Downsizing to a new home that requires lower upkeep ushers in the start of a new life of less responsibility, no job to report to, new friends to make, and working your way through that bucket list. But one thing holds true, if there are discounts to enjoy, a wise retiree on a fixed income should take advantage.

Many newly retired folks move to a new city and don't necessarily know where to find specials and discounts meant just for them. Listed here are only a few to check out in your new community.

Where to go, what to ask

Big ticket items seem like they wouldn’t come with deals for seniors, but you only need ask, “Do you offer a senior discount?” to find out. Thinking of taking a cruise? Many well-known cruise lines offer special deals for seniors include Royal Caribbean that offers “reduced senior prices only on selected sailings exclusively for guests who are 55 years of age and older” and Carnival Cruise Line’s “exclusive savings for Seniors, age 55 and older." So, don't just book your trip, check to see if specific ships or dates have a better discount. Other travel deals include RV rentals, bus excursions, flights, Amtrak, National Parks, and hotels. Try this site for more information.

Another big-ticket item is car insurance discounts. Check with your current provider. If they don't offer a discount, you can find one online. Just search for "senior discount car insurance." Then, see if you might get a discount on a mortgage refinance by talking to your bank or mortgage lender.

Groceries are another area to pop the question. Several market chains offer discounts of specific days to patrons. Check out this link for the best, most up-to-date listing of grocery stores with discounts. And along with groceries, check out this list of restaurants offering special deals for the mature crowd. If you’ve moved to a new city, utilize your restaurant discounts to meet new friends and explore different foods.

Not to be left out, the fast food and casual-fast industries offer special deals, up to ten percent off your meal, early bird specials, senior menus, free coffee, and more. Don’t be timid about it. Ask at the register and keep a list of your favorites.

Dress in style with retail discounts at popular stores. Some require specific days while others have particular age limitations, but with some deals up to 20 percent off, and even more at well-known thrift stores, you can shop til you drop.

Finally, save on prescriptions at all the national chain pharmacies, so be sure to ask about what's available for you.

If you’re wondering what special deals might be available to you, talk to your senior living real estate specialist for recommendations.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kim Daneault on 6/30/2019

Many people are joining the home flipping frenzy. Whether you are working on making a profit or just plain bored and wanted to make a quick buck, it was the field to be, but that is not always the case. 

People have forgotten the fact that when they flip houses, they are spending money, time, and effort. It is not in any way just focused on making a quick buck, and for some, it even means making some losses.

Maybe it is all part of the business, or perhaps it is all part of life, the only sure thing is the reality that people are not always as smart as they would like to believe. 

With that, if you are looking to "make a quick buck," flipping houses is not for you. If you want to make a career out of hard work and make sure you earn enough money for your efforts, the following are the best ways to ensure making a profit when flipping houses.

If you are just starting out, take smaller risks. No matter how people would say that a neighborhood is up and coming or a building as so much potential, it should be you and your budget which should do the talking. Taking smaller risks can mean any of the following:

- Buying a house with fewer changes that need to get done;

- Getting any home inspected before making a purchase;

- Knowing what you want to do with the house before you commit; and

- Spending less than 20% of your budget towards building the house more “habitable.”

Do not buy a house that is a former crack den or one that has pipe problems or gas issues; you may end up losing more money than making them. These places are right as investments for developers who would tear the whole house apart and start anew.

Always time your purchases. The economy goes up and down, and real estate is always fluctuating. If you want to make a profit, buy when the economy is down and make a sale when the real estate market is booming.

Now that you know how to do things the right way, it is easier to make sure that you make the right profit. If you would like to join forces with a professional, you can always do so. Contact a real estate agent today for some quick tips on how you can make the right purchase or that ultimate sale.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kim Daneault on 6/23/2019

The cost of buying a house extends beyond a seller's initial asking price. In fact, there are many "hidden" costs that buyers need to consider as they decide whether to purchase a house, such as:

1. Closing Costs

There are various closing costs that a buyer may encounter before he or she finalizes a house purchase, including survey, appraisal and wire transfer fees. As such, it generally is a good idea to prepare for these costs prior to launching a house search. Because if you prepare for closing costs, you can ensure that you have the finances available to cover these expenses when you are ready to complete a house purchase.

Oftentimes, it helps to meet with banks and credit unions prior to starting a home search. These financial institutions can help you get pre-approved for a mortgage and teach you about home closing costs. Best of all, after you get a mortgage, you can start your home search with the financing you need to secure your ideal residence.

2. Property Taxes

Property taxes usually are assessed twice a year, and they vary based on state and county. However, if you learn about property taxes, you can map out your homebuying budget accordingly.

Real estate property tax information is part of the public record. Thus, you can access information about property taxes related to a particular home before you purchase it. And once you have this information at your disposal, you can use it to determine whether to move forward with a house purchase or continue your search for your dream home.

3. Utilities

Utility bills vary based on the size of a home, its location and other factors. If you devote time and resources to estimate your utility expenses, you may be better equipped than ever before to make an informed home purchase.

To assess your potential utility costs, you may want to consult with a seller's agent. This professional may be able to provide you with insights into the current homeowner's utility expenses to help you budget appropriately.

It never hurts to hire a real estate agent to help you navigate the homebuying journey, too. A real estate agent can offer expert insights into closing costs, property taxes and other homebuying fees, as well as help you quickly discover your dream residence.

Let's not forget about the comprehensive homebuying guidance that a real estate agent can provide, either. For instance, if you are unsure about whether to submit an offer to purchase a house, a real estate agent can offer recommendations and tips to help you make the best-possible decision. Or, if you have concerns or questions at any point during the homebuying journey, a real estate agent is ready to respond to them.

For those who want to buy a house, it helps to learn about all of the potential costs associated with a home purchase. If you start budgeting for a home purchase today, you could accelerate your quest to find and buy your ideal residence.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kim Daneault on 6/16/2019

In real estate terminology, you may hear about various ratios and where you need to fall within the ratio to qualify for the home you want. A ratio simply expresses a relationship between two values: they compare two things, so a student/teacher ratio might be shown as 18:1, or one teacher for every 18 students. Different ratios apply to residential home buyers, investors, sellers, and lenders, but here are a few that might apply to you.

Loan-to-value or LTV

A comparison between the amount of a mortgage loan and either the home’s purchase price (for new buyers) or its appraised value (in a refinance) is its loan-to-value ratio. Lower LTVs typically qualify a buyer or homeowner a lower interest rate because there is less risk of default to the lender. So, a conforming mortgage with 20 percent down often garners a lower rate than an FHA loan with only five percent down.

Higher LTVs place more risk on the lender so if the market drops, the home could be “upside-down” or worth less than the amount of the mortgage.

Debt-to-income ratio or DTI

More important to home buyers is the debt-to-income ratio. Also called a debt-service ratio, it expresses how much money the borrower makes monthly compared to the monthly ongoing debt payments and obligations. A lender uses this figure to determine how high a mortgage payment you can handle. The first number is your income (gross) from your job, plus any other income that can be counted such as child support or a trust disbursement that you can use to make your mortgage payment plus taxes and insurance, and if applicable, association dues.

The second number uses the same calculation as the first plus any long-term debt such as a vehicle or school loan and consumer debt. This amount is the percentage of your income used to pay housing and long-term debt. So, a ratio of 30:37 (also written 30/37) means you spend 30 percent of all your income on housing with no more than seven percent obligated to debt service. That leaves you with 63 percent of your income for food, auto insurance, medical bills, clothing, and other expenses. Qualifying ratios adjust over time, but the Federal Housing Administration lists the qualifying ratio and the formula to determine it to qualify for an FHA loan.

Price-to-income ratio

Your DTI comes from your personal debts and income, and the LTV comes from a specific home's value, but the price-to-income ratio expresses the affordability of housing in a given locale. Most often, it is the ratio of the median home price to the median household disposable income. This ratio helps you determine if the home you want to buy is overpriced (it will be hard to sell) or under-priced (super good deal) for its geographical location. Lenders use this ratio as one additional factor in determining risk for that specific home.

To learn where your ratios fall and to determine if an area is right for your household budget, let your local real estate professional guide you.







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