Kim Daneault
KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan | 603-345-7783 | [email protected]


Posted by Kim Daneault on 8/9/2020

Photo by Wes Hicks on Unsplash

Owning a condo can provide you with the best of both worlds. While you own your unit, ownership of the common areas, land and building are shared. The other members of the condo association share costs with you. Either a property management company or the board of directors is responsible for making any big decisions. 

There are a number of advantages of condo living but there are six big ones: 

1. No Outside Maintenance

Regardless of the season, there is always outside work that needs to be done. Thankfully, if you live in a condo, then someone else is responsible for mowing the grass, pruning the trees and shoveling the walks. You also won't have to worry about making any repairs to the outside structures. The condo fees that you pay monthly are designed to pay for these services. 

2. Customize Your Space

If you rent an apartment, you're usually limited in the ways you can decorate. This isn't the case when it comes to condo living. You can paint the walls to suit your tastes, hang pictures wherever you like and even renovate to create the perfect space. 

3. Access to Amenities

Many condo buildings offer amenities that aren't included in many homes or apartment buildings. Tennis courts, a gym, basketball courts and a swimming pool are just a few of the popular options. 

4. Prime Location

Living space in a major city can often be difficult to find -- not to mention expensive. Opting for condo living often provides a practical solution to this issue. You'll also be able to enjoy easy access to things like shopping, cultural events, dining, public transportation, work and more. 

5. Share Major Costs

Typically, a portion of your condo fees are earmarked for a reserve fund. This is used for major repairs like replacing the roof, renovating the exterior or repaving the parking lot. In the event that the reserve fund isn't sufficient to pay for a needed expense, you won't have to bear the cost alone. Instead, it will be equally shared among all the condo owners. 

6. Extra Security

Some condo buildings have a secure entrance, are gated or have a doorman. Having neighbors that live beside you might make you feel safer. If you travel, you won't have to worry about your home as much. 

Condo living can allow you to enjoy the freedom of homeownership without the negatives that sometimes go along with it. A local real estate agent can help you find a condo that meets your needs. 





Posted by Kim Daneault on 8/2/2020

Photo by Wulfman65 via Shutterstock

When youíre thinking about purchasing a home, an old house versus that new one is something to ponder. If youíve thought about buying an older home, consider each of these areas before making an offer. Have your agent write contingencies into your contract, and by all means, donít forego an inspection.

Consider HazMat

Say what? A lot of folks donít realize that over the years, materials routinely used in homebuilding fall out of favor and become potential issues when you decide to renovate or remodel your older home. Some examples of hazardous materials are:

  • Lead pipes. Once used for standard plumbing, even sealed lead pipes can eventually allow toxic lead to leach into your water. Replacing all the plumbing in your home is an extensive and expensive process entailing removing floors and walls, tearing out concrete, and digging up landscaping. Before making an offer, have the water tested for lead.
  • Lead pipes arenít the only problem. Older homes often have lead paint as well. Although it may be painted over with a non-hazardous paint, if paints chip and reveal the older materials, you might be exposed to higher concentrations of lead than you realize.
  • Asbestos. Homes built before the 1980s often had asbestos in the ceiling texture and insulation. Removing asbestos is an expensive side cost to any renovation. In addition to interior asbestos, many homes have asbestos siding and roofing materials that require HazMat removal as well. If the existing materials remain in place, thereís no law against them, but if you disturb them to install an addition or reface your home, they require proper mitigation.

Structural Challenges

A common issue with older homes is damage to the foundation from years of shifting ground, water seepage and expansion, and improper additions. When more weight sits on a home, from a new roof installed over the top of the old one, for example, the extra weight puts stress on bearing walls and the foundation. Footers exposed to erosion from running water might not continue to carry that weight. You wonít notice it at first, but eventually, youíll find yourself repairing cracks in the plaster more frequently. An experienced home inspector will detect potential problems, so pay attention to the inspectorís report about potential, future issues with a home.

Lastly, older homes have long-term exposure to pests. Termites, carpenter ants, and other wood-damaging pests can hide their damage from you, but an inspector knows where to look. Along with disclosure of asbestos and lead issues, insist on pest control mitigation in your contract for an older home. Let your agent know how old a home youíre willing to purchase to avoid these issues.




Tags: Homebuyer   Renovation   old house  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kim Daneault on 7/26/2020

Photo by James Balensiefen via Unsplash

An outdoor entrance that provides an attractive, welcoming appearance not only has the ability to enhance the curb appeal of your property, it also makes household residents and visitors with a warm visual reception to your home. You probably already know that hanging baskets and planters brimming with blooming flowers provide vibrant accents from spring through autumn, but entryways need more than flowers, particularly during late autumn, winter, and early spring. Here's what you can do to keep your outdoor entry area looking pulled together and appealing no matter what the season.

Plant Evergreens

Whether you place a dwarf spruce or Norfolk pine in a planter or plant arborvitae or another upright conifer tree in the ground near your steps, some kind of greenery is usually necessary to make an outdoor entryway look fully dressed. It also helps keep a bit of color going during the cold season. As an added bonus, you can decorate your evergreens with holiday lights and other embellishments during the celebratory season.

Create a Small Seating Area

Even if all you've got is a set of steps leading to a tiny landing, try to find room for a chair or a bench. This is functional as well as welcoming because it provides a place for people to sit and remove outer footwear before entering the home or to simply sit and relax for a minute or two before going inside after a long day at work. If you've got the room, a small bistro set made from weather-resistant materials adds a nice touch and provides a fun way to enjoy a casual family meal or round of beverages.

Install an Exposed Aggregate Walkway

Exposed aggregate walkways do double duty by serving as a highly attractive introduction to your home and providing a slip-proof surface that helps keep household residents and guests safe from potentially harmful slip-and-fall accidents. You can get as creative as you like with these and use aggregates in a variety of colors or simply stick with an understated, monochromatic look. For instance, you can use agate aggregate for a multicolored effect and oyster shell aggregate for a lustrous look. Add ground-level solar lights along the sides to show it off after dark.

Other ideas for creating a fabulous outdoor entryway include hanging a decorative door with features such as carved floral accents or stained glass, putting down rustic outdoor rugs  in front of the door, and placing accent items such as basketry or statuary on each side of the door. Have fun with it and don't be afraid to put some personality into it.

Please feel free to reach out to us for more advice on making the most of your home's appearance.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kim Daneault on 7/19/2020

Let's face it Ė most homebuyers have limited time and resources at their disposal. As such, it is crucial for buyers to do everything possible to optimize their time and resources throughout the property buying journey. Because if a buyer maximizes his or her time and resources, this individual can boost the likelihood of enjoying a successful homebuying experience.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a homebuyer get the most out of his or her time and resources.

1. Craft a Homebuying Strategy

If you know you want to buy a home, you should develop a property buying strategy. That way, you can map out the steps you'll need to take to find and acquire your dream residence.

A typical homebuying strategy should account for your budget, timeline and other property buying factors. If you analyze these factors, you could streamline your quest to discover your ideal house.

2. Narrow Your Home Search

You plan to buy a house as soon as possible, but you still have no idea where you want to reside. Fortunately, if you hone your house search to a few cities and towns, you may be able to quickly and effortlessly find a great home in an area you can enjoy for years to come.

As you get ready to start a home search, consider your long-term plans. For instance, if your ultimate goal is to work in a big city, you may want to focus on houses in or near major metros. Or, if you want to raise a family, you may want to search for residences near outstanding schools and parks.

In addition, perform lots of research into various cities and towns. If you conduct plenty of research, you can find out whether certain areas match or exceed your expectations and tailor your house search accordingly.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a property buying expert who understands what it takes to find a terrific residence at a budget-friendly price. Thus, if you hire a real estate agent today, you can get the help you need to reap the benefits of a seamless home search.

Oftentimes, a real estate agent will meet with you, learn about your property buying goals and craft a personalized homebuying strategy. He or she also will respond to your homebuying concerns and questions throughout the property buying journey. By doing so, a real estate agent ensures you can receive expert support as you try to find your dream house.

A real estate agent will make it simple to search for houses that fall within your budget and correspond to your homebuying criteria too. Plus, if you want homebuying recommendations or suggestions, a real estate agent is happy to provide them.

Want to enjoy a fast, successful homebuying experience? Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble making the most of your time and resources as you search for your ideal house.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Kim Daneault on 7/12/2020

Buying is home is a lengthy and, at times, stressful process. So, it can be discouraging when your offer is rejected.

If youíve recently had a purchase offer rejected by the homeowner, donít worry--you have options.

In this post, weíre going to cover some of those options so you can start focusing on your next move and potentially even make a second offer that gets accepted.

1.  Reassess your offer, not the seller

You could spend days guessing the reasons the seller might not have accepted your offer if they didnít give you a straightforward answer.


However, your time is better spent addressing your own offer. Double check the following things:

  • Is your offer significantly lower than the asking price?

  • If so, is it lower than comparable sale prices for homes in the neighborhood?

  • Does your offer contain more than the usual contingencies?

Once youíve reassessed, you can determine if a second offer is appropriate for your situation, or if youíre ready to move onto other prospects with the knowledge youíve gained from this experience in hand.

2. Formulate your second offer

So, youíve decided to make another attempt at the house. Now is the time to discuss details with your spouse and real estate agent.

Out of respect for the sellerís time and their timeline for selling the home, you should treat your second offer as your last.

So, make sure youíre putting your best offer forward. This can mean removing those contingencies mentioned earlier or increasing the amount. However, be realistic about your budget and donít waive contingencies that are necessary (commonly appraisals, inspection, and financing contingencies).

3. Consider including a personal offer letter

In todayís competitive market, many sellers are fielding multiple offers on their home. To set yourself apart from the competitors and to help the seller get to know your goals and reasoning better, a personal letter is often a great tool.

Donít be afraid to give details in your offer letter. Explain what excites you about the house, why it is ideal for your family, and what your plans are for living there.

What shouldnít you include in your offer letter? Avoid statements that try to evoke pity or guilt from the seller. This seldom works and will put-off most buyers to your offer.

4. Moving on is good time management

If you arenít comfortable increasing your offer or if you receive a second rejection, itís typically a good idea to move onto other prospects. It may seem like wasted time--however, just like a job interview that didnít go as planned, itís an excellent learning experience.

Youíll walk away knowing more about the negotiation process, dealing with sellers and agents, and you might even find a home thatís better than the first one in the process!




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