Kim Daneault
KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan | 603-345-7783 | [email protected]


Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/25/2020

Photo by Aymane Jdidi via Pixabay

Most people do not think of creating an estate plan before they are in their 40s or even their 50s. However, if you own a home, regardless of the cost of the home and regardless of your age, you should create an estate plan. Even if you are in your 20s, your family could end up losing a high-end home if you are in an accident and become incapacitated or you lose your life. Always contact an experienced estate attorney for help drafting your will and other estate documents, including trusts.

Titling Your Home

In today’s day and age, many people decide to live together without formally getting married. Most closing agents will title your home so that you own one half and your significant other owns one half. In most states, your significant other’s half of the house will have to go through probate unless the house is appropriately deeded. The ways you may title your home include:

  • Joint Tenancy: Gives you equal rights to the property. If one party passes, the ownership of that person’s half passes to the surviving tenants. However, if you are not married, you will have an extra step to take if you want to transfer your half to someone not listed on the deed.

  • Tenancy in Common: This is the most common way deeds are titled if two people buying a house are not married. Both parties have equal rights to the property. However, if one person passes, their half goes to their heirs and not to the other person on the deed unless that person is an heir. Each person can take out a mortgage on their half without getting permission from the others on the deed. This type of title usually has to go through probate.

  • Tenants by the Entirety: Only those legally married may title their home as tenants by the entirety. The house is automatically transferred to the living spouse. The property does not have to go through probate if it is titled as tenants by the entirety.

You may title your home in other ways, though those ways are not as common. Creating a will and a trust, along with titling your home properly, ensures that your half goes to the person you want it to go to, and, if done correctly, could save your spouse or significant other the hassle of going through probate.

Creating a Trust

Many types of trusts exist. When you choose the right type of trust for your situation, you may be able to avoid probate and avoid some taxes when your home transfers on your death. However, the main reason for a trust is so that your loved one may continue living in the home or taking care of the financial responsibility of your home should you become incapacitated. Certain trusts also keep your home and its equity from being eaten up by creditors such as nursing homes and doctors. Always consult an attorney to discuss the complexities of creating a trust and the rest of your estate plan.





Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/18/2020

Photo by Jan Mallander via Pixabay

When youíre a new homeowner in a new community, you donít always know how to handle unforeseen emergencies. Before that day arrives, take the time to learn your community so that a minor issue doesnít become a major catastrophe.

Handling Household Emergencies

Whether itís a burst pipe or a broken window, household emergencies always seem to happen after hours or on weekends when service providers and insurance agents arenít always available. When your roof leaks during that Sunday morning rainstorm or you find puddles in front of the dishwasher, youíll wish you already had a relationship with a plumber or a roofer.

Often, emergency repair crews charge extra for weekend or evening callouts. They also might offer a temporary repair to get you through the weekend, but youíll still need to have a regular service provider come in to complete the work during the week.

Find a Source & Have a Backup

The service provider you choose for regular projects and new installation may not be the only number you need. Ask them if they provide emergency services. If not, who do they recommend? Hereís a brief list of on-call experts you need the names and numbers of to get you through the off hour challenges.

Emergency Roofers: These folks donít reroof your home, necessarily. Their expertise is in finding the source of a leak ó or potential leak in the case of storm damage ó and placing a protective cover over it until inclement weather passes. Once the weather improves, they usually offer to inspect the roof for damages and refer you to a crew that performs insurance repairs.

Electrical Issues: Start with your local utility. They often offer emergency services and procedures to prevent a crisis. Once the critical time passes though, youíll need to involve certified electricians to repair or rewire your home.

Natural Gas or Propane Emergencies: Likewise, should prompt you to call your provider. This is particularly true if you smell gas and cannot identify or turn off the source when checking for extinguished pilot lights on stoves, furnaces, water heaters and fireplaces. Call the gas company emergency line immediately. But do not use your cell phone inside or leave family members or pets in the house. Go outside or to a neighborís house to call. Theyíll mitigate any urgent issue and propose what needs repairing, but donít usually repair those issues themselves. Instead, theyíll direct you to licensed contractors experienced in residential gas-line installation and repair.

Weather-Related Emergencies and Natural Disasters: They can happen any time, no matter where you live in the country. Be proactive in learning where the nearest shelters are for tornadoes and hurricanes. Learn the evacuation route and drive it several times if you live in a flood-prone, tsunami or water-surge area. Contact your local emergency services or the American Red Cross to learn disaster preparedness techniques and to find local information. 




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Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/11/2020

After you accept a homebuyer's offer on your residence, he or she likely will complete a home inspection. Then, the homebuyer may choose to move forward with the home purchase, rescind or modify his or her offer or ask the home seller to complete home improvements.

Ultimately, a home seller is likely to have many questions following a home inspection, including:

1. What did the homebuyer discover during the home inspection?

As a home seller, it is important to do everything possible to enhance your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can boost your chances of generating substantial interest in your house. Plus, when a homebuyer performs a home inspection, he or she is unlikely to find any problems that may slow down the home selling process.

An informed home seller may conduct a home appraisal prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This appraisal enables a home seller to identify potential trouble areas within a residence and explore ways to address such problems.

If you failed to perform a home appraisal, there is no need to worry. For home sellers, it is important to see a home inspection as a learning opportunity. And if a homebuyer identifies problems with your residence during a home inspection, you should try to work with him or her to resolve these issues.

2. Should I stand my ground after a home inspection?

Be realistic after a home inspection, and you'll be able to make the best decision about how to proceed.

For example, a home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty may address major home problems prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This home seller will dedicate the necessary time and resources to correct home problems and ensure a homebuyer is able to purchase a top-notch residence.

But what happens if a homebuyer identifies problems during a home inspection, despite the fact that a home seller already tried to correct various home issues?

A home seller should consider the homebuyer's inspection report findings closely. If minor home repairs are needed, he or she may be able to fix these problems to move forward with a home sale. Or, if a homebuyer is making exorbitant demands, a home seller may feel comfortable allowing the homebuyer to walk away from a home sale.

3. How should I proceed after a home inspection?

A home inspection can be stressful for both a home seller and a homebuyer. After the home inspection is completed, both parties will be better equipped than ever before to make informed decisions.

If a homebuyer encounters many problems with a residence, he or she will let the home seller know about these issues. Then, a home seller can complete assorted home repairs, offer a discounted price on a home or refuse to perform the requested home maintenance.

Working with a real estate agent is ideal for a home seller, particularly when it comes to home inspections. A real estate agent will negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf and ensure you streamline the home selling process.





Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/4/2020

Your outdoor lighting is perhaps one neglected area of your home. For both safety and beauty, the outdoors deserve a certain amount of attention when it comes to lighting. There are plenty of ways that you can make your outdoor lighting both welcoming and practical.


Layer It


Just as you would inside your home, you should try to layer your lighting. To do this, you should include many different kinds of lighting especially lighting that brightens the outside walls of the home, highlights landscaping elements, and even some overhead lighting.


Use Decorative Lighting


Decorative lanterns and lamps are an easy way to add lighting to your outdoor spaces. You can let them stand on their own, spread them out, or you can group them and line them up in certain areas like a wall or a table. Candles are also a great way to multi-purpose practical lighting with decorative lighting. 


Light Your Steps


Itís important to provide adequate lighting on stairs and decks. Anywhere that people can trip is a place that needs adequate lighting. Solar powered lights are perfect for these uses.


Use String Lights


String lighting hung overhead can be perfect for courtyards, decks, roofs, or even trees and shrubbery. If you donít have anything to hang string lights from, you can always get creative using posts and planters. This is a great non-permanent solution for you to have some pretty lighting available.


Donít Draw Too Much Attention To Your Property


While you want adequate lighting on the outside of your property, you also donít want to draw attention to an area of your yard. The whole neighborhood doesnít need to know that youíre out on your deck, hanging out. Choose lighting that provides an inviting glow without an overpowering brightness.            


Use Table Lamps


You may have thought that table lamps are only for the indoors, but think again. Your outdoor setup can be the same as your indoor setup. Put table lamps down on your outdoor tables for adequate illumination. Be sure that the lamps youíre using are rated for the outdoors. 


If you use the right techniques and always be sure that youíre following safety protocols,  you can find success with your outdoor lighting scheme. When your home is properly lit, the best part is that youíll be able to enjoy the outdoors of your home much more thoroughly during seasonable times. Youíll also have an increased sense of security and comfort in and around your home. Itís well known that burglars are deterred from intruding on well-lit properties. Set up your outdoor lighting right and get the outdoor season off on the right foot.




Tags: outdoors   lighting  
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Posted by Kim Daneault on 9/27/2020

Photo by Luis Quintero from Pexels

While the millennial generation (people born between 1980 and 1989) accounts for the majority of homebuyers today, the other generations--both older and younger--cannot be discounted. Aging Baby Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) and up-and-coming Gen Yers (those born between 1990 and 1998) are still forces to be considered when marketing your home. How do you position your property so that appeals to young families, middle-age professionals and those past retirement age? Below are just a few tips on how to do this seemingly impossible task.

1. Opt for Neutral Colors.

While older homebuyers make be attracted to dramatic colors and accent walls, younger buyers are looking for a blank palette that they can personalize. Using white, beige, gray and similar tones for walls, cabinets and carpeting will please those buyers without alienating baby boomers who are adept at adding color with art and accessories.

2. Embrace Technology.

Buyers of all generations are increasingly savvy about properties on the market and neighborhoods, due to the amount of information available online. Most buyers search online for available properties before they ever contact a real estate professional. Make sure that your home is showcased online with lots of images and even a video "walk-through".

3. Make your Home Low Maintenance.

Buyers of all generations want to enjoy their home without having to do a laundry list of chores to keep it well-maintained and attractive. This means keeping your landscaping to a minimum as well as choosing low-maintenance materials like laminate flooring and composite siding when you remodel.

4. Create a Walkability List for Potential Buyers.

Younger buyers want to have shopping, dining, schools and other conveniences nearby, so they don't waste precious time driving to and from attractions. Older buyers may have limited mobility and thus want services close by. Access to public transportation is also a plus for buyers of all ages. Write a list of what's available nearby so that your potential buyers have all of those facts at hand and don't have to do all of the research themselves.

Making your property attractive to multiple generations of homebuyers doesn't have to be an impossible task. Set yourself up for success--and a quick sale--by sticking with neutral colors, making your property available to online shoppers and educating your potential buyers on what services and attractions are available near to your home.




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